The House Appropriations Committee signaled their intention to start marking up Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 spending bills. On April 29, it released the draft fiscal year 2020 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (LHHS) funding bill, which was approved out of subcommittee today. The LHHS bill is the largest non-defense appropriations bill. It will be the first of 12 annual appropriations bills to be considered by the Appropriations Committee for FY 2020. The Committee intends to move at least two bills per week during May to finish by mid-June.

In total, the LHHS bill includes $189.8 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $11.7 billion over the 2019 enacted level and $47.8 billion over the President’s 2020 budget request. A full committee markup is expected next week.

The bill would allocate a total of $99 billion to Health and Human Services (HHS), up $8.5 billion from FY 2019 levels.

As part of that total, the bill allocates:

$4 billion to CMS - up $315 million from the FY 2019 level
$41.1 billion to the National Institutes of Health (NIH)—up $2 billion from the FY 2019 level (including $25 million to support firearm injury and mortality prevention research)
$5.9 billion to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)—up $115 million from the FY 2019 level
$8.3 billion to Center for Disease Control (CDC)—up $921 million from the FY 2019 level and $1.7 billion (including $25 million to support firearm injury and mortality prevention research)
$7.6 billion to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)—up $475 million from the FY 2019 level
$358 million for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)—up $20 million from the FY 2019 level

The bill also includes:

An extension of the moratorium on current breast cancer screening guidelines until January 1, 2022
$150 million through September 2022 to award grants to communities and organizations for Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics
$3.8 billion for substance use disorder prevention and treatment—up $14 million from the FY 2019 level
$3.2 billion for HIV/AIDS research
$1.5 billion for state grants for substance use disorder prevention and recovery efforts, including $50 million for tribes and tribal organizations severely affected by substance misuse;
$17 million for SAMSHA's Suicide Lifeline
$14 million for SAMSHA's Zero Suicide initiative

The full bill text may be found here. A full summary may be found here.

Before the budget can be adopted, the House and Senate will need to agree on final language before the new fiscal year starts this fall. Without an agreement, Congress may need to approve a stopgap budget bill that would extend current-year funding.

Please let us know if you have any questions.


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